Not ready for primetime

4 February, 2009
Rat Fink

But I’m going in anyway. We’ll see how the day shakes out, especially with a tap rehearsal until 8:15 p.m. Heh. Should be funny.

So today, since I’m already (still) weak and not the least bit certain that I’ll get through the day without passing out and making a fool of myself, I put the onus on you, my fiends. Here is a question for you today because I’m interested in your opinions:

Should we just accept Michael Phelps’s apology and get on with it? Or should there be consequences?

Weigh in if you like. All opinions will be treated with respect and open-mindedness (unless, of course, you’re smug about the Super Bowl results).

Fink (off to get ready for school, not without a small bit of trepidation) out.

:-)

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Stein
Stein
4 February, 2009 8:03 am

An apology is great, but doesn’t fit the payment for the crime. How many people would get arrested for this very same thing? I knew of people that went to ONU with me that were arrested on underage drinking and drug possession because they posted pictures of themselves doing the crime on FACEBOOK. Look… nobody’s perfect, but don’t be stupid about it. He dug his own grave on this one. This whole story is like eating a really fancy cake that leaves an aftertaste of bile. Great, our gold-medalist is a pot-head. Even if he’s not, that image will forever… Read more »

PKPudlin
PKPudlin
4 February, 2009 8:49 am

Michael Phelps is an adult and can make his own decisions about what he does with his own time/money etc. He probably understands and accepts that every action carries a consequence. What he did not take into consideration is the fact that he is a celebrity, and as such, is expected to live on a higher plane than we mere mortals – resonate to a higher octave, if you will. Being a celebrity carries with it certain burdens, one of which is that his behavior is held to a higher standard. Michael Phelps the Celebrity represents my country to the… Read more »

kodye
kodye
4 February, 2009 11:25 am

I honestly don’t understand what the big deal is. He was doing something that I’m sure over half of the worlds population has done before. He was just hitting a “marijuana pipe”… it’s not like these were pictures of him shooting heroine, punching old women, or stealing Christmas presents from children. I just think it’s funny that everyone is going crazy over him smoking weed, but the fact that he’s probably drunk as a skunk, and according to reports was more than likley cheating on his girlfriend, is totally socially acceptable. I’m done though… you can’t defend someone smoking weed… Read more »

Ross
Ross
4 February, 2009 2:45 pm

i disagree with any opinion that attempts to pardon him. look, his athletic achievements in and of themselves do not require him to be a role model. that’s a moral decision. but when he decided to cash in on his achievements and accept big money, it’s a whole different system. the companies he endorses should sieze this opportunity to drop him before he becomes a dead albatross around their necks. can you recall another pro athlete of similar accomplishments who had any LESS charisma than him? kid’s a doorknob. his name will be always be good for the US olympic… Read more »

TRO
TRO
4 February, 2009 6:33 pm

I smoked pot in high school/college and I turned out alright.

Oops, did I say that?

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Ross
Ross
5 February, 2009 5:46 am
Reply to  Rat Fink

I don’t think this is old-fashioned at all; in fact it’s rather progressive. It makes me think of my own opinion as the old-fashioned, or more conservative one. your schadenfreude comment was funny. it reminded me of what a great word it really is, and how it represents one of the few outstanding aspects of the german language- the traincar phrasings that sum up whole concepts. Did you read Middlesex? It’s the greatest novel since Rabbit, Run and surely a top ten over the last century. Astonishingly beautiful book, a life-changing read. anyway it has one passage where the protagonist… Read more »

TRO
TRO
4 February, 2009 10:04 pm

On a serious note, I don’t think this is going to hurt his endorsement deals much if at all. Right or wrong, most people don’t care enough about some young man smoking pot to make a big change in their buying habits. Especially when he seems to be sincerely showing remorse and an understanding of how his actions do impact on others, which I for one believe he is. As to his being a role model. Well, among swimmers and swim fans I guess he might be, but the Olympics doesn’t have the oomph it used to have when it… Read more »

BoomR
BoomR
6 February, 2009 10:35 am

Personally, I think he did the right thing by coming forward with an apology right away (vs. staying silent). All this talk about role models & how his celebrity status requiring him to live even more above board gives me pause to remind many of you: HELLO??? This happened FOUR YEARS before his near-nekked body hit the big screen during the Olympics!! So that made him what? 20 at the time? He was a college kid doing what college kids do (well, except me… I waited until I was 31 before I smoked my first green fat one when I… Read more »

BoomR
BoomR
7 February, 2009 12:35 am
Reply to  Rat Fink

I humbly stand corrected – and I feel bad for him on several levels. But as others have commented, you do something really stupid as an adult (and get caught in a Kodak moment to boot), then you should be ready to pay the piper. And I speak from MAJOR experience (if you buy me a couple white zins at that little watering hole the next time I’m town, I may share my tale of woe). OK..the hot tub has finally warmed up – I’m off to soak my head! **smooch**

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